Word Podcast 260 – with Jeff Evans

Jeff Evans
Photo: Dave Lloyd Jones

In which Jeff Evans returns from researching the full history of “Rock and Pop On British TV” for his new book and talks to Mark Ellen and David Hepworth about not just “Six Five Special” but also “Cool For Cats”, not just Legs and Co but also Ruby Flipper, not just “The Tube” but also “The White Room”, and wonders whether, now that we have YouTube, we have finally come to the end of music television as a genre.

Word Podcast 259 – Paul Gambaccini

Photo: Dave Lloyd Jones

In which Paul Gambaccini, that son of New York who became an institution of British broadcasting, talks to Mark Ellen and David Hepworth about how the Beatles changed his life, how he got into broadcasting, what brought him to Britain, his experience of Radio One in the 70s, his recent ordeal at the hands of the Metropolitan police – fully documented in an amazing book Love, Paul Gambaccini – and how this experience has changed his view of the BBC and the Labour Party but not the British people. It’s an extraordinary listen, one that goes the full distance from hilarity to horror.

Word Podcast 258 – Mick Houghton and Adam White

In which Mick Houghton, the author of a book about the legendary folk-rock label Elektra, and Adam White, the man behind a huge tome about the history of Motown, talk to David Hepworth about the unique challenges faced by independent labels, the charismatic men who founded them, the occasionally difficult stars they had to deal with and what keeps both Jac Holzman and Berry Gordy going at an age when most people are happy just to look at their great-grandchildren.

Word Podcast 255 – Hunter Davies, the only authorised biographer of the Beatles

In which David Hepworth talks to legendary journalist and author Hunter Davies about his time as a fly on the wall with the Beatles in the middle sixties and his newly-published Beatles Book. Includes: a Chinese meal in Bangor in 1967, the writing of “Getting Better”, the time McCartney turned up in the middle of the night and the cost of a house in London in the mid-sixties.

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