Podcast 311 – in which Alexis Petridis describes what it was like to ghost-write the most amazing story in pop

Alexis Petridis was very lucky Elton John chose him to help tell the story in his best-selling memoir “Me”. Elton John’s equally lucky Alexis agreed because without him it probably wouldn’t be half as good as it is. In fact it’s two stories: the first is the story of a musical career that seems to be headed nowhere until a chance meeting with a lyricist began a partnership which operated in an unprecedented way and led to unprecedented success; the other is a personal story of how a very tense little boy from Pinner grew to be able to afford all the addictions on a Pharaonic scale, managed to conquer them and belatedly found contentment in a state that wasn’t even invented when he was first a superstar. Every home should have a copy because everyone in that home would find at least some of it jaw-dropping. Alexis told us what it was like to write and what he learned about life in the process.

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Podcast 310 – in which Barney Hoskyns helps us celebrate the 70th birthday of Tom Waits

On December 7th Thomas Alan Waits celebrates his 70th birthday and to mark that occasion we asked Barney Hoskyns, the author of his biography “Lowside Of The Road”, to talk about what makes Waits one of the rare examples of a misfit who has prospered on his own terms. It’s all here: developing his shtick entertaining the line of customers outside, choosing to dress in a way that had gone out of style twenty years before, living his character twenty four hours a day, being taken in hand both personally and professionally somewhat late in the day and eventually becoming a success on his own terms. Barney thinks he as important an artist as the 20th century has produced. He came along to explain why.

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Podcast 309 – in which Andrew Collins saves you the trouble of deciding what are the best rock films of all time

It’s always good to welcome Andrew Collins back to the pod. Andrew was with us most recently to talk about the new edition of his official biography of Billy Bragg. This time he’s got his movie hat on, as befits the man who writes about films for the Radio Times and presents “Saturday Night At The Movies” on Classic FM. Since 2019 has been such a bumper year for music biopics we asked him to remind us what are the best of breed in ten categories ranging from fiction to festivals and everything inbetween. You probably won’t agree with it all but it will probably leave you determined to have a look on Netflix and search out some overlooked classic.

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Podcast 308 – in which Graham Parker talks about 40 years of squeezing out sparks

Graham Parker had an unusual career trajectory. “I didn’t pay my dues until after I had some success,” he says. In the wake of his greatest triumph, 1979’s “Squeezing Out Sparks”, he broke up his partnership with the Rumour and moved to America. Here he was the unwitting beneficiary of a record business which had difficulty adapting to a changed world. In the 80s and 90s, he says, they actually gave him too much money. A few years back he resumed his partnership with the Rumour, who were all present and correct and all got on with each other, a state of affairs almost unique in rock and roll. Together they were featured in the Judd Apatow film “This Is Forty”. He currently commutes between his homes in London and the United States and begins a UK solo tour in Exeter on November 21st. The full date sheet, which includes a show at the Union Chapel on the 25th, is here. He may be coming to your town. If he does go and say hello.

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Podcast 307 – Dylan Jones has written an entire book about the unrepeatable perfection of Glen Campbell’s “Wichita Lineman”.

The big hit records of today are assembled. The great records of 1968 were made. In a few cases they just happened, seemingly brought into being by some higher power over and above the efforts of any one individual. In his new book “Wichita Lineman: Searching In The Sun For The World’s Greatest Unfinished Song” Dylan Jones traces the combination of inspiration and chance which makes this “the world’s greatest unfinished song” and, more to the point, arguably the greatest pop record ever made.

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Word podcast 306 – Daniel Rachel puts the 90s in perspective with his excellent book about the rise and fall of Cool Britannia

Daniel Rachel talked to everyone from Noel Gallagher to Tony Blair for his new book “Don’t Look Back In Anger” and he came in to Word In Your Ear to talk about how Kate Moss, David Beckham, Alan Macgee, Damien Hirst, Alastair Campbell and many others, knowingly or otherwise, managed to shape Britain’s last feelgood decade, which began with Spike Island and finished with the death of Diana. We guarantee, this will change the way you think about the era you lived through.

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Word podcast 305 – Dave Lewis on 40 years in the service of Led Zeppelin

When Dave Lewis first went to see Led Zeppelin at the Empire Pool, Wembley in 1971 it cost him 75p. When they played their final show at the O2 in 2007 he was on Robert Plant’s guest list. From the germ of his teenage scrapbook he built a small empire, based on his fanzine “Tight But Loose”, which has produced a staggering range of titles dedicated to every aspect of Led Zeppelin’s career. His book “Evenings With Led Zeppelin” has the distinction of being literally the heaviest book ever to feature on “Word In Your Ear”. Dave came in to the Islington to talk about what got him excited in 1971 and, as you’ll hear, still excites him today.

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Word podcast 304 – Ian Penman on the strange magic of the human voice

For more than forty years Ian Penman has been one of the best writers about music in the country. His new book, “It Gets Me Home, This Curving Track“, is made up of essays about James Brown, Prince, Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, John Fahey and other musicians who have a strange fascination for him. Ian came to the Islington to talk about his career as a writer, the book and his plan to write a book about searching for music in charity shops. Be warned. This is the kind of book that will send you straight back to your records to listen for things that you’ve been missing.

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Word podcast 303 – Will Birch on the career of Nick Lowe, Least Hardworking Man In Show Business

Is Nick Lowe the only musician of his generation who has actually got better as he’s got older? How did he survive the Famepushers hype? How did England’s most laid-back musician become the Midas of the punk era? What’s the secret of his success as a producer? What does he understand that most other musicians don’t? Will Birch, a musician himself, has known him a long time, and has written “Cruel To Be Kind”, the definitive biography of one of our great musical institutions.

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Word Podcast 302 – Peter Doggett on the 50 year dysfunctional marriage of Crosby, Still, Nash and Young.

Fifty years ago to the week the first Crosby, Stills and Nash LP was released in the UK, holding out the prospect of brotherly love in close harmony. Thus begun half a century of bitter infighting, chemical and sexual excess, regular break-ups and tearful reunions, all of which is documented in lip-smacking detail in “Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young” by one of our favourite authors Peter Doggett. He came along to the Islington to talk to Mark and David about it.

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