Podcast 317 – in which Pete Paphides talks about the many things he learned about life from pop music

Pete Paphides’ acclaimed “Broken Greek” is, as David says when introducing him, the best book written by a former Smash Hits reader and looks set to do for unjustly uncelebrated popular music what Nick Hornby did for football in “Fever Pitch”. This chat encompasses: Abba, West Brom, the Multi-Coloured Swap Shop, Mind Your Language, shopping for singles at Woolworths, living above a chip shop, hoping to be adopted by the Brotherhood Of Man and making the amazing discovery that John Lennon and Paul McCartney actually used to be in the same band!

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Podcast 316 – in which Dan Franklin talks about how metal explains the world

Dan Franklin’s first book “Heavy” chronicles his life-long love affair with heavy music in all its different manifestations, from Meat Loaf to Sunn 0))), and argues that it deserves a lot more respect than it gets as a rule. It’s a story that takes us from a cassette copy of a Guns N’ Roses album thrust into the hands of a puzzled eight-year-old, via the fields of Donington and the mosh pits of Camden to the lengths a new father will go to free a Type O Negative CD from the mangled remnants of a family car.

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Podcast 315 – in which the Backlisted boys talk Great Musical Biographies

John Mitchinson and Andy Miller do the award-winning Backlisted podcast which, as they like to say on the tin, “brings new life to old books”. They’re also big music fans so we thought they would be the ideal people to come along and talk in their own inimitable style about what they feel are some of the best and sometimes overlooked examples of the genre.

That’s how come, in a wide-ranging discussion we came to touch on “Dino: Living High In The Dirty Business Of Dreams” by Nick Tosches, “Black Vinyl, White Powder” by Simon Napier Bell and Levon Helm’s “This Wheel’s On Fire”, “Nico: Songs They Never Play On The Radio” by James Young, Julian Cope’s “Krautrock Sampler”, Stephen Sondheim’s “Look: I Made A Hat” and “I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead: The Dirty Life and Times of Warren Zevon” by Crystal Zevon, all of which are in their different ways recommended.

Conversation covers: how much a rock star gets for their memoirs, how to tell if an anecdote is made up or not, why Julian Cope doesn’t mind you downloading his book for free and how you, yes you, can easily increase the amount of reading you do.

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Podcast 314 – in which Bethan Roberts talks about “Graceland”, her novel about Elvis and his mum

We were delighted to welcome Bethan Roberts to Word In Your Ear to talk about her novel “Graceland“. This is based on the most important relationship in the life of Elvis Presley. His mother Gladys brought him up single-handedly when his father went into prison, she encouraged his singing, she feared for what the girls would do to him and what the managers might take from him, wished he didn’t have to go away so often and would have preferred him to be a furniture salesman married to a nice local girl with some grandchildren on the way. Then, when he was undergoing basic training in the army, she died.

People say that Elvis was never the same after he went in the army. In fact he was never the same after his mother died. Bethan tells us about how she got the idea for the book, what fascinates her about the intense relationship between mother and son and while, as she explains, the odd incident may have been embroidered, the basic facts of her narrative are not in dispute. What’s most amazing, when you read “Graceland”, is that nobody’s written this story before. This book is highly recommended, not merely to fans of Elvis, but for anyone who wants to understand what sudden dramatic fame does to the nearest and dearest of the Famous One.

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Podcast 313 – In which Sid Smith talks about fifty years of King Crimson

When Sid Smith first finished his definitive biography of King Crimson in 2001 he thought, not unreasonable that would be that. But then Robert Fripp reactivated the band and so Sid had to take up his pen once more. This has resulted in an even more definitive work “In The Court Of King Crimson”. He came to Word In Your Ear to run Mark and David through the key facts of their extraordinary rise and their exceptional longevity, what it’s like to spend six weeks on the road with a bunch of musical gentlemen of a certain age and why he’s not planning to put down his pen just yet.

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Podcast 312 – In which Mike Barnes assures us progressive rock was more than hobbits and flute solos

In his new book “A New Day Yesterday”, an account of progressive rock in the 1970s, Mike Barnes tells the story of how this peculiarly British musical form was born out of the Small Faces’ “Itchycoo Park” and the Graham Bond Organisation and went on to flourish throughout the 70s in the universities of Britain and the arenas of the United States. He talks to Mark and David about all the issues that matter: capes, mellotrons, seated audiences, prolonged soloing, the real names of the members of Quintessence and whatever happened to Egg.

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Podcast 311 – in which Alexis Petridis describes what it was like to ghost-write the most amazing story in pop

Alexis Petridis was very lucky Elton John chose him to help tell the story in his best-selling memoir “Me”. Elton John’s equally lucky Alexis agreed because without him it probably wouldn’t be half as good as it is. In fact it’s two stories: the first is the story of a musical career that seems to be headed nowhere until a chance meeting with a lyricist began a partnership which operated in an unprecedented way and led to unprecedented success; the other is a personal story of how a very tense little boy from Pinner grew to be able to afford all the addictions on a Pharaonic scale, managed to conquer them and belatedly found contentment in a state that wasn’t even invented when he was first a superstar. Every home should have a copy because everyone in that home would find at least some of it jaw-dropping. Alexis told us what it was like to write and what he learned about life in the process.

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Podcast 310 – in which Barney Hoskyns helps us celebrate the 70th birthday of Tom Waits

On December 7th Thomas Alan Waits celebrates his 70th birthday and to mark that occasion we asked Barney Hoskyns, the author of his biography “Lowside Of The Road”, to talk about what makes Waits one of the rare examples of a misfit who has prospered on his own terms. It’s all here: developing his shtick entertaining the line of customers outside, choosing to dress in a way that had gone out of style twenty years before, living his character twenty four hours a day, being taken in hand both personally and professionally somewhat late in the day and eventually becoming a success on his own terms. Barney thinks he as important an artist as the 20th century has produced. He came along to explain why.

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Podcast 309 – in which Andrew Collins saves you the trouble of deciding what are the best rock films of all time

It’s always good to welcome Andrew Collins back to the pod. Andrew was with us most recently to talk about the new edition of his official biography of Billy Bragg. This time he’s got his movie hat on, as befits the man who writes about films for the Radio Times and presents “Saturday Night At The Movies” on Classic FM. Since 2019 has been such a bumper year for music biopics we asked him to remind us what are the best of breed in ten categories ranging from fiction to festivals and everything inbetween. You probably won’t agree with it all but it will probably leave you determined to have a look on Netflix and search out some overlooked classic.

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Podcast 308 – in which Graham Parker talks about 40 years of squeezing out sparks

Graham Parker had an unusual career trajectory. “I didn’t pay my dues until after I had some success,” he says. In the wake of his greatest triumph, 1979’s “Squeezing Out Sparks”, he broke up his partnership with the Rumour and moved to America. Here he was the unwitting beneficiary of a record business which had difficulty adapting to a changed world. In the 80s and 90s, he says, they actually gave him too much money. A few years back he resumed his partnership with the Rumour, who were all present and correct and all got on with each other, a state of affairs almost unique in rock and roll. Together they were featured in the Judd Apatow film “This Is Forty”. He currently commutes between his homes in London and the United States and begins a UK solo tour in Exeter on November 21st. The full date sheet, which includes a show at the Union Chapel on the 25th, is here. He may be coming to your town. If he does go and say hello.

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